Cheap cut of steak? Make them taste like Fillet Mignon!

Beef Steak with red and black pepper Anyone who loves a great grilled steak feels frustrated over the current high price of beef. Forbes explains that a jump in the price of corn because the renewable fuel standard was...

Beef Steak with red and black pepper
Beef Steak with red and black pepper

Anyone who loves a great grilled steak feels frustrated over the current high price of beef. Forbes explains that a jump in the price of corn because the renewable fuel standard was diverting the product from feed to the creation of ethanol is the main reason that beef and other livestock have experienced a price jump. Recent droughts in cattle-producing areas like Texas have not helped either. Many people have had to cut back on protein, especially beef. Some have even been tempted to go full vegetarian.

While most analysts assure us that the price bubble for beef, as well as for poultry and pork, will burst in a year or so, that doesn’t help the buyer now looking at the high prices of prime beef at the supermarket. However, a method exists, according to a site called Steamy Kitchen, to turn even the cheapest, subpar cut of steak into something that tastes like it was prepared at one of the best restaurants in the world. Here follows advice on cooking cheap steaks to make them taste like Fillet Mignon.

The idea is to lay out the cuts of steak that you propose to grill and to cover both sides with kosher salt or sea salt. Examples of cheaper cuts of steak include flank, chuck, round, skirt, and some of the cheaper sirloins. Then you set the steaks aside for an hour for each inch of thickness. An interesting biochemical reaction takes place that is, in essence, a quick way to dry age the steak, a process that often takes weeks.

The salt draws the water content of the steak to the surface, drying the meat quickly. At the same time, some of the salt gets absorbed back into the inside of the steak, adding to its natural flavor. The salt also has the effect of loosening up the fibers of the meat, thus making it tenderer. Tenderized meat will tend to trap the fat and meat juice during cooking, thus making it more flavorful.

Some people will add other spices to the salt, such as crushed garlic and rosemary, which would be absorbed to the inside of the steak as well. Rosemary has the added benefit of blocking some of the cancer-causing carcinogens that are created when meat is cooked over a flame. You can try other herbs and spices to taste, such as you would ordinarily use in a dry rub.

At the end of the one plus hour, you rinse the salt off of the steak and then pat it as dry as possible with paper towels. Any water content left on the surface of the steak would tend to steam the meat rather than sear it, making it blander. This method of preparation is better than the standard way most home cooks do steaks, which is to apply a dry rub immediately before cooking. That method creates a tasty crust on the steak, but leaves the insides bland and relatively not as tasty.

Raw, dry-aged steak does not look pretty, resembling nothing more than a meaty prune. However, once it is cooked, there is nothing like it in the world.

The only step left after removing the salt and water from the steak is to cook it according to your preference. Many home chefs like to cook their steak over a backyard grill. However, a perfectly acceptable method would be to pan sear the steak to hold in the juicy flavor. Then you finish it up in the oven for a couple of minutes or so.

Then you can serve up your steak with some garlic butter or some other kind of sauce and amaze your family and friends with how wonderful it tastes.

For more information contact us.